SPRINT FINISHES, FRACTIONS OF A SECOND; CAPE TO CAPE COMES DOWN TO THE WIRE

After four days and more than 200km of the toughest and fastest racing the iconic Cape to Cape MTB stage race has ever seen, it was a happy, dusty and beat up group of riders who rolled across the finish line at the Margaret River Distilling Co.

None more happy, than the GIANT Shimano team of Brendan Johnston and Jon Odams who wrapped up the Epic Series ‘Triple Crown’ of Port to Port, Reef to Reef and Cape to Cape with another stunning performance against the best riders in the nation.

For Brendan it was also his eighth Epic Series win on the trot, but it nearly didn’t eventuate. With a tough stressful night threatening to derail everything on the eve of stage four.

“I was feeling really rough and didn’t get enough food in last night and really struggled this morning. I woke up and didn’t want to race, so I knew it was going to be a tough one. I kept it from Jonny because I didn’t want him to just worry about himself. He rode really well and we got to the finish, but I wasn’t quite strong enough on the road at the finish. It was pretty hectic run home and the Trek boys were going for time on second place overall, so we were just along for the ride.”

“It is unreal to think that I have strung together eight Epic Series wins, and Jon and I pulling together the Triple Crown for the Men’s Pairs. To have all those individual wins and roll into the pairs and have the same amount of success straight away at all three events, is pretty cool.”

“I love the Cape to Cape week. Everyone comes over and I have really good friends with the riders and the crew. I will keep doing it as long as I can and to share it with Jonny and living the battle together is something new and exciting. It is really cool,” Brendan said.

Jon Odams was delighted to pull off the victory in an incredibly tough event.

“When you look at how close the times are and the average speeds on the stages, they are super, super fast and everyone is just trying to ride everyone off their wheel, so the pace is certainly up. We have had a sprint finish every stage and the 20 metres today was the biggest gap of the week. It has been super exciting and just shows you how tough the racing has been. No-one can get away and it is just the mix of which teams are in the front bunch that has varied.”

The racing was fast and furious in every category, but the Men’s Open Pairs racing produced the highlight of all highlights.

Going into the final Margaret River stage the third place Trek Shimano Team of Cameron Ivory and Calllum Carson needed to find 54 seconds to rein in team Double Trouble and grab second place on the podium, as Ivory explained.

“We had a bit of time to make up and we knew it was going to be on and we had to leave it all out there. With about 10km we got a bit of a break and it was us and the GIANT Shimano guys and we all got away and tried to stay away from Reece Tucknott and Brent Rees (Double Trouble). We just emptied the tank out there and came onto the tar finish and Cal launched it and expected me to get on his wheel. I could barely hold it so, we lost a few seconds there. I was absolutely cooked but it was nice to get the stage win.”

What Cameron was unaware of was that after four days his spectacular dash for the line would leave his pair a mere 0.2 of second short, with Double Trouble holding on for second place in the most dramatic circumstances.

“It is very exciting and has been an awesome four days,” Double Trouble’s Brent Rees said. “But having a crash when the race was just starting to come together was unfortunate and we lost about 30 seconds there. Thankfully we got over our disagreement very quickly and Reece pulled on his ‘power pants’ and brought us home strong.”

Reece explained that in the last moments of sprint finish Brent pulled off what was a inspired move coming half a bike length up on him, as they went across the line.

“That put his transponder half a bike length closer than just being on my wheel. That simple move can buy you half a second on where you are on the timing mat. That is almost unbelievable really,” Reece said.

After four days, it proved to be the move of the race, holding off Trek Shimano by two tenths of a second.

“0.2 second over four days. It just goes to show what an awesome race this and that anything can happen. It is not over until it is over. Holy shit, lucky I came off your wheel,” Brent proudly told his team mate.

Holly and Michael Harris continued their outstanding form, with the Cape to Cape victory wrapping up the mixed pairs “Triple Crown” for the Armidale siblings.

“We had someone challenging us every day and it made for really fine racing,” Holly said. “We were racing each other but cheering for each other as well. We love the single trail here and you honestly don’t get better single trail than here in Margaret River. We were loving the Pines, they are schmick.”

“Winning the Triple Crown and getting a belt buckle is what I have been waiting for. I am going into Margaret River this afternoon and get myself a belt because I got my belt buckle. I am pretty excited,” she declared.

Michael said the brother sister combination took to the pairs racing like ‘ducks to water’.

“It was fun and I couldn’t ask for a better pair. We haven’t even had a little tiff or anything although Holly claims I pushed into a tree and used her as a speed hump.”

Holly is also pretty happy with how things are tracking but is keeping her brother on his toes.

“I am very content, but applications are always open, but we will see,” she jibed. “I had an awesome week and a great way to tie up the year. It was the best group of people and the best trails. What more can you ask for? I am chuffed.”

Fox and Racoon (aka Briony Mattocks and Anna Beck) eventually got their act together to wrap up the women’s open pairs but it wasn’t without its comical and traumatic moments.

“The Fox and Racoon really felt more at home when we got some stages with some single track. We are little bush creatures and we like riding in the outdoors. The single track allowed us to play to our strengths and use it as a way to catch back on, if we had mechanicals, or to get a gap. I think we played it pretty well.”

“We haven’t had the greatest luck this week but we never really gave up. There were times when we thought we might chuck it in, but we just kept going. We didn’t cry on the trail at all. After the trail maybe, but not on the trail.”

“I really love pairs racing and it brings another dynamic. I have raced Cape to Cape as a solo a number of times so it was really great to do it as a pair. It adds something different and it changes the way you race the race,” Briony said.

“It also brings some riders out of the woodwork,” Anna added. “We have some really strong junior girls who are testing the waters with this type of racing and getting some good experience. Of course, the road girls came across and had a really good dig as well. Hopefully we will see more them at up coming races, we need more girls racing.”

 

GC Teams: Open Men Pairs

1          GIANT- SHIMANO AUSTRALIA                                07:49:15

2          DOUBLE TROUBLE R&R                                          07:50:36

3          TREK-SHIMANO AUSTRALIA                                  07:50:36

4          NANKERVIS CUP                                                      07:53:02

5          VDP BANDITS - GIANT BIKES - SHIMANO             08:03:59

 

Stage 4 Teams: Open Men Pairs

1          TREK-SHIMANO AUSTRALIA                                  01:39:44

2          GIANT- SHIMANO AUSTRALIA                                01:39:47

3          DOUBLE TROUBLE R&R                                          01:40:37

4          NANKERVIS CUP                                                      01:41:41

5          VDP BANDITS - GIANT BIKES - SHIMANO             01:44:44

 

GC Teams: Open Women Pairs

1          FOX AND RACCOON                                                09:15:21

2          Specialized Duo                                                          09:25:02

3          Motion girls                                                                 10:17:34

4          Sparkly Unicorns                                                         10:38:53

5          TEAM 4T2/KALAMUNDA CYCLES                           11:11:45

 

Stage 4 Teams: Open Women Pairs

1          FOX AND RACCOON                                                01:59:20

2          Specialized Duo                                                          02:02:20

3          Motion girls                                                                 02:08:20

4          Sparkly Unicorns                                                         02:13:59

5          TEAM 4T2/KALAMUNDA CYCLES                           02:19:26

 

GC Teams: Mixed Pairs

1          SRAM MTOSS                                                           08:33:46

2          SHIMANO PUSHYS CANNONDALE                        08:43:44

3          MORONI BIKES BENDIGO                                       08:45:09

4          Trek Shimano Australia                                              08:57:45

5          GIANT WOLLONGONG                                             09:29:22

 

Stage 4 Teams: Mixed Pairs

1          SRAM MTOSS                                                           01:52:55

2          SHIMANO PUSHYS CANNONDALE                        01:53:36

3          MORONI BIKES BENDIGO                                       01:54:48

4          Trek Shimano Australia                                              01:56:38

5          GIANT WOLLONGONG                                             02:00:52


LEARNING NEW TRICKS AND PICKING UP STICKS AT CAPE TO CAPE

Cape to Cape’s 76km Boranup Forest stage tested riders to the limit, producing some remarkable efforts and a few upsets, as the iconic four day stage race reached the halfway point.

Despite some sensational riding from Double Trouble (Reece Tucknott and Brent Rees), the GIANT Shimano Australia team of Brendan Johnston and Jon Odams kept things under control in the men’s open pairs.

But it was a different story in the open women’s and mixed pairs with Fox and Racoon (Briony Mattocks/Anna Beck) and the Maroni Bikes (Peta Mullens/Jarryd Maroni) turning the tables and grabbing very classy stage wins.

Fox and Racoon’s Anna Beck must have wondered what MTB gods she had upset, collecting every stick along the course, in a manic attempt by the environment to derail her team’s chances of a stage win. In a gutsy display of mental toughness and sheer determination they finished victorious with Fox and Racoon 1, Mother Nature 0.

“Leading into the forest Anna had mechanical and I was standing with the spectators for three or four minutes as everyone was riding past. Then the poor girl just picked up every stick on the course and stopped maybe four times to get sticks out of the drive train. She did very well to hang in there and we just didn’t give up and kept riding back to the group,” Briony said.

“Having done this stage before I knew about all the sketchy, skatey stuff through the top section and I put on a bit of speed to try and throw the Specialised girls off. We held them off on the grass but given they have a bit of time they might have let us have the stage win. There cannot be any more bad luck left, so we are really excited for the great single track of stage three and four.”

Stage two was a welcome return to winner’s circle for former Cape to Cape champion Peta Mullens. Riding with Jarrod Moroni in the mixed pairs, they found the course to their liking and turned the tables on the in form Harris siblings.

“I haven’t done a MTB race for about eight months I really surprised myself today after struggling on stage one. I haven’t done much on the MTB or the bike at all and I had a crash last week and my knee was kind of sore. But I really like this course and feel like I ride into it very well and I knew I would suffer on the first couple of climbs, so we let three or four of the pairs distance us and one by one we brought them back. Then like a real roadie, Jarryd wanted to whack it on the fire trail with 2km to go. So, we did. I feel like I am just warming up but we won’t get ahead of ourselves. It is really nice to have strong mixed competition and I am just happy to get a stage win.”

The ever smiling Holly Harris wasn’t too disappointed with second place in the stage and was delighted to have her mentors take the honours.

“It is so cool to be racing with Peta and Jarrod, they are like my heroes and I have always looked up to them. When I was young I was on a team with Peta and she taught me so much and she is such a good role model for the sport. So, to be able to race with them was really fun. We were with them until a km to go and they hit us pretty hard. Mick worked really hard to keep me there, but I just didn’t have the legs to go with them.”

Keeping the GIANT Shimano Australia Team honest, Double Trouble have really been living up to their name but the boys know that with a 30 second deficit, and Johnston and Odams on fire, they have to pull out all stops in the final two days.

“It was a bit unexpected today,” Reece Tucknott said. “There were a few points in the stage where I didn’t expect to be anywhere near the lead but we managed to come back. At 5km to go we had a bit of a gap but I wasn’t sure how Brent was feeling. I knew I was half decent, so we thought we would give it a crack and decided to drive it. But of course all Brendan and Jon have to do is follow the moves which they did. Tomorrow have to follow the moves too, but we also have to be the instigators. We have to ride smart and stay in good position to be in for a shot.”

At the mid point of the race, GIANT Shimano Australia are in the box seat but there is a lot of riding to get through before they can afford to celebrate.

“Today was a cool stage, it was fast and I thought we might have had everyone come together but Reece and Brent really sensed it at the creek crossings and the gap opened up and they chatted for a while to see whether they would commit or not. And they did. But for us it was just a matter of sitting on. We don’t have to drive the group. So, it was our job to just follow them in,” Brendan said.

“It is very competitive this year and the difference between the teams isn’t much, so it is all about tactics and positioning. Jon was awesome today and followed all the moves and we covered everything, so I am really pleased with how we are doing that.”

Despite a novel preparation Kathryn McInerney is riding strong in the solo women’s, enjoying every twist and turn of the trails and everything Cape to Cape has to offer.

“I find it hard to motivate myself over winter, so I spent a lot of time running, trail running and the last couple of weeks I have done a few big rides. It is a funny preparation for me, but it seems to be working. Surprisingly I am feeling quite good and I am a lot more relaxed this year and just taking everything in my stride. It has been really fun. With two stage wins I am really happy with how it is has worked out. But there are always people you want to chase down, so in the coming days the plan is to be mixing it with the elite women’s pairs, so that is the goal for the second half of the race.”

Team GC Teams: Open Men Pairs

1          GIANT- SHIMANO AUSTRALIA                    04:02:23

2          DOUBLE TROUBLE R&R                              04:02:53

3          TREK-SHIMANO AUSTRALIA                      04:03:47

4          NANKERVIS CUP                                          04:04:15

5          GIANT WA RACING                                       04:06:44

 

Team Stage 2 Teams: Open Men Pairs

1          GIANT- SHIMANO AUSTRALIA                    02:33:13

2          DOUBLE TROUBLE R&R                              02:33:14

3          NANKERVIS CUP                                          02:33:29

4          GIANT WA RACING                                       02:33:29

5          TREK-SHIMANO AUSTRALIA                      02:33:29

Team GC Teams: Open Women Pairs

1          Specialized Duo                                              04:45:37

2          FOX AND RACCOON                                    04:47:37

3          Motion girls                                                     05:17:11

4          Sparkly Unicorns                                             05:39:53

5          TEAM 4T2/KALAMUNDA CYCLES               05:52:07

Team Stage 2 Teams: Open Women Pairs

1          FOX AND RACCOON                        02:56:39

2          Specialized Duo                                  02:56:43

3          Motion girls                                         03:14:18

4          TEAM 4T2/KALAMUNDA CYCLES   03:25:00

5          Sparkly Unicorns                                 03:27:23

 

Team GC Teams: Mixed Pairs

1          SRAM MTOSS                                               04:21:15

2          MORONI BIKES BENDIGO                           04:27:06

3          SHIMANO PUSHYS CANNONDALE            04:29:30

4          MTRX - CHOP CHOP RACING TEAM          04:30:14

5          Trek Shimano Australia                                  04:36:53

 

Stage 2 Teams: Mixed Pairs

1          MORONI BIKES BENDIGO                           02:43:46

2          SRAM MTOSS                                               02:44:26

3          SHIMANO PUSHYS CANNONDALE            02:46:22

4          MTRX - CHOP CHOP RACING TEAM          02:47:35

5          Trek Shimano Australia                                  02:51:54

 

Solo GC

Male

1          Open Men       Trevor Spencer                       04:10:23

2          Open Men       Michael Rice                          04:13:22

3          Masters Men   Damon Willmore                     04:14:17

Female

Pos      Cat      Name  Gun Time

1          Open Women              Kathryn McInerney     04:45:23

2          Masters Women          Kristen Gardner          04:55:58

3          Masters Women          Fiona Crowe   05:12:38

The State Government of Western Australia is proud to support the Cape to Cape MTB through Tourism WA's Regional Events Program.

Cape to Cape – MTB Stage Race, Western Australia 16 – 20 October 2019

Time Trial Wednesday 16 October, 2019

4:30pm Top 20 Elite Open Teams - Leeuwin Estate Winery, Stevens Rd, Margaret River

Stage 1 – Cape Leeuwin 17 October, 2019

Start and finish: Cape Leeuwin - Distance: 40km - Climbing: 840m

Race start 9:00am      Cape Leeuwin Lighthouse, Leeuwin Rd, Augusta

Stage 2 – Boranup Forest 18 October, 2019

Start and Finish: Leeuwin Estate - Distance: 72km - Climbing: 620m

Race start 8am - Leeuwin Estate Winery, Stevens Rd, Margaret River

Stage 3 - Cowaramup - Middle Earth 19 October, 2019

Start and Finish: Colonial Brewery - Distance: 56km - Climbing: 540m

Race Start 8am - Colonial Brewery, 29 Osmington Rd, Bramley

Stage 4 – Margaret River Special Stage 20 October, 2019

Start and Finish:  Margaret River Distillery - Distance: 37km - Climbing: 460m

Race Start 8am           Margaret River Distilling Co - Carters Rd and Maxwell Rd, Margaret River


RECORD SET AND PACE ON AT CAPE LEEUWIN

Since 1895, the Cape Leeuwin lighthouse has had its fair share of historic moments but none like this, with a record of more than 1 300 mountain bikers assembling to tackle this iconic stage, and kick off the MTB celebration that is Cape to Cape.

With time bonuses on offer, Wednesday evening’s fast and furious prologue at Leeuwin Estate had offered a chance to not only blow out the cobwebs but also grab a welcome time advantage. The result was only seconds separating the main pairs on the clock, and the guarantee of an exciting morning on the trails.

The men’s pairs were flying, covering the 39km stage in less than 90 minutes. In a desperate drive to the line the stage honours went to team “Double Trouble’, Reece Tucknott and Brent Rees, who edged out the GIANT – Shimano team of Brendan Johnston and Jon Odams.

“We were third in the prologue yesterday but crossed the line with Jonny and Trekky here today, the time is usually taken on the two closest team mates, so we focused on that. We were also mindful that we didn’t want Cam Ivory and Callum Carson (Trek Shimano) to catch us,” Tucknott said.

“We worked nicely together on the descent and the run home and it is great to be able to pick up the stage win and be second overall. There are good and promising signs for the rest of the week and based on who was together until the last 5km, the next three days are going to be unpredictable. So, we will see how we go in the single track in coming stages.”

Adjusting for time bonuses, GIANT-Shimano grabbed the leader’s jersey and with an unbeaten record on the line this year, they are determined to defend it all the way to the finish at the Margaret River Special stage on Sunday morning.

“There was some pretty serious riding going on out front with ten or twelve of us at the front of the race most of the day,” Johnston said. “There are some good climbs at the end of the stage which made it really hard and we were trying to keep it together and all up, I think we did pretty well.”

“I think this year’s race is going to be very tight, especially with the pairs format it will be harder to get away which always makes it that much more difficult. We will see. This race is always close and while it is hard to get the leader’s jersey, it is also hard to lose it, if you are riding well.”

Cam Ivory and Callum Carson will revel in the conditions in the following stages and they were pleased to be in the mix on day one and having a fun day out on the bike.

“It was nice to have the legs and we pushed it pretty hard and managed to get into a nice bunch working together to pull away but we just dropped off on the final climb. It is always close at Cape to Cape but the pairs has changed the tactics and I am expecting to see bunches at the finish all week with everyone trying to get the uphand coming into the sprint. It should be good for the spectators but is definitely fun out there on the bike. It is awesome,” Ivory said.

Leading the Mixed Pairs and in eight place overall, Holly Harris and brother Michael have launched their assault on Cape to Cape in style. With the Port to Port and Reef to Reef titles in the bag, they looking for a threepeat to wrap up the Epic Series.

“I am in so much pain, there was a lot of climbing, sticks and fire roads and I even saw two metre long snake and nearly jumped onto Mick’s bike,” Holly laughed.

“I am a little bit weaker on the time trial and it is not my forte, so it was good to minimise the damage there yesterday. So, it is nice to have a good stage today to consolidate a handy lead. Mick has just come back from tonsil surgery and he can breathe properly, so he is flying. I was glad to be able to pedal a bit harder today and keep up.”

After the time trial and winning stage one of Cape to Cape, you would never suspect that Canberra based roadies Lucy Bechtel and Ella Bloor were making their off road debut. Normally racing for the Specialised Women’s Racing Team, the pair have gone to the ‘dark side’ for a bit of fun and a change of environment.

“I took a year off, so this is my comeback, coming out of retirement, so I am pretty fresh. Racing was a last minute decision, about two weeks ago we put it all together. I have had a few injuries, so this year for me is to do everything I have wanted to do and Cape to Cape was one of those things. I am living life this year and this race was on the list,” Lucy said.

“This is our first stage race, so we thought we would pick a good one to start with,” Ella said. We have always talked about riding Cape to Cape, so when the opportunity presented itself, we thought ‘Why not?’. We haven’t thought too much about the next few stages and are just taking it day by day. Although we have been getting some tips from the very fast riders we are staying with.”

Team GC Teams: Open Men Pairs

1          GIANT- SHIMANO AUSTRALIA                    01:29:09

2          DOUBLE TROUBLE R&R                              01:29:39

3          TREK-SHIMANO AUSTRALIA                      01:30:18

4          NANKERVIS CUP                                          01:30:46

5          GIANT WA RACING                                       01:33:15

 

Stage 1 Teams: Open Men Pairs

1          DOUBLE TROUBLE R&R                              01:30:09

2          GIANT- SHIMANO AUSTRALIA                    01:30:09

3          TREK-SHIMANO AUSTRALIA                      01:30:33

4          NANKERVIS CUP                                          01:31:31

5          GIANT WA RACING                                       01:33:31

 

GC Teams: Open Women Pairs

1          Specialized Duo                                              01:48:54

2          FOX AND RACCOON                                    01:50:58

3          Motion girls                                                     02:02:52

4          Sparkly Unicorns                                             02:12:30

5          TEAM EFFORT                                              02:21:17

 

Stage 1 Teams: Open Women Pairs

1          Specialized Duo                                              01:49:54

2          FOX AND RACCOON                                    01:51:43

3          Motion girls                                                     02:03:22

4          Sparkly Unicorns                                             02:12:45

5          TEAM EFFORT                                              02:21:17

 

GC Teams: Mixed Pairs

1          SRAM MTOSS                                               01:36:48

2          MTRX - CHOP CHOP RACING TEAM          01:42:39

3          SHIMANO PUSHYS CANNONDALE            01:43:08

4          FOCUS ATTAQUER                                      01:43:20

5          Trek Shimano Australia                                  01:44:59

 

Stage 1 Teams: Mixed Pairs

1          SRAM MTOSS                                               01:37:18

2          MTRX - CHOP CHOP RACING TEAM          01:42:53

3          FOCUS ATTAQUER                                      01:44:05

4          SHIMANO PUSHYS CANNONDALE            01:44:08

5          Trek Shimano Australia                                  01:45:14

 

The State Government of Western Australia is proud to support the Cape to Cape MTB through Tourism WA's Regional Events Program.

Cape to Cape – MTB Stage Race, Western Australia 16 – 20 October 2019

Time Trial Wednesday 16 October, 2019

4:30pm Top 20 Elite Open Teams - Leeuwin Estate Winery, Stevens Rd, Margaret River

Stage 1 – Cape Leeuwin 17 October, 2019

Start and finish: Cape Leeuwin - Distance: 40km - Climbing: 840m

Race start 9:00am      Cape Leeuwin Lighthouse, Leeuwin Rd, Augusta

Stage 2 – Boranup Forest 18 October, 2019

Start and Finish: Leeuwin Estate - Distance: 72km - Climbing: 620m

Race start 8am - Leeuwin Estate Winery, Stevens Rd, Margaret River

Stage 3 - Cowaramup - Middle Earth 19 October, 2019

Start and Finish: Colonial Brewery - Distance: 56km - Climbing: 540m

Race Start 8am - Colonial Brewery, 29 Osmington Rd, Bramley

Stage 4 – Margaret River Special Stage 20 October, 2019

Start and Finish:  Margaret River Distillery - Distance: 37km - Climbing: 460m

Race Start 8am           Margaret River Distilling Co - Carters Rd and Maxwell Rd, Margaret River


ROK’D UP - DESTINATION CAPE TO CAPE

There are many ways to prepare for Western Australia’s iconic four day MTB stage race Cape to Cape, but Brisbane couple Ben Lehmann and Lena Anson-Smith have probably found the most entertaining, slowest and adventurous on record.

In April 2019, they rented out their Brisbane house, said goodbye to their family and friends, packed up their belongings, the dog and their MTBs and hit the road. The only thing they knew for sure is that they had to be in Margaret River in time for Cape to Cape, the rest of it they were making up on the fly.

Currently on schedule and heading down the west coast, Ben, Lena and Lewis the Bischoodle, aka Rok’d Up Adventures, are on the journey of a lifetime, travelling in their trusty VW Amarok and towing their luxury off road caravan through iconic Aussie towns such as Airlie Beach, Mt Isa, Mataranka, Katherine, Darwin, Derby and Broome and squeezing in some unbelievable MTB training along the way.

An ‘underground Sparky’ who works fly in, fly out in a coal mine in central Queensland, Ben originally got the idea to ride Cape to Cape from an MTB magazine he picked up on his way to work.

“I sometimes buy a magazine at the airport when I am on my way to work. That week I bought Australian Mountain Bike magazine and someone had done a story on Cape to Cape. I thought that would be pretty cool to go over and do a race/ride type of thing with a festival feel, craft beer and food at the end of it.”

“I have had that idea in my head for a couple of years but only recently found out there were three other races in the Epic series. Before we started the trip we booked in Cape to Cape to make sure we would get into Margaret River in time for the race.”

Ben has always ridden road and dirt bikes but when he got into MTB ten years ago it was just casual weekend warrior thing with mates. Eventually he introduced Lena to the excitement of heading off road and she hasn’t looked back.

"I have been riding my first bike for about three years now and loving it. Then after taking our bikes to NZ last year and doing some downhill mountain biking in Queenstown we decided to upgraded my bike for a better fit and to be more downhill specific. Since training for the event I have upgraded again for a bike more designed for cross country and to keep up with Ben. I am really enjoying it and love a good challenge"

“We are riding a bit while we are travelling. When we were in Darwin we were near some MTB trails we found on Trailforks and we were getting in 30-50km about three times a week. We have also been getting in plenty of small rides along the way, just riding the gravel roads as far as we can go, just to get the saddle time.”

“We are getting a really good feel for the country being out on our bikes, like in Derby when we went out to the sandy mud flats, to the wharf and through town. It was a nicer experience and being on a MTB really affords us some cool opportunities to see different places.”

After 15 years in Real Estate and seven running her own business, Lena said the ‘endless’ road trip was all about a life change.

“We bought a house last year and we decided that domestic life wasn’t for us, so we thought we would hit the road. We thought we either do it now or when we are older, so we bit the bullet and did it. Originally it was a bit daunting to be driving, not knowing where you are going with no real destination, except that we had to make it in time for Cape to Cape. It took a bit of getting used to, but then you get in the groove and it is normal now. Since then we haven’t looked back and we love it.”

“We have never done a MTB race before, but we have entered as a pair and we thought Cape to Cape would be a great way to see the area. I don’t mind a glass of wine and really do want to go to the vineyards, so Margaret River was another motivation for doing the race.”

“We really haven’t been roughing it. We have a luxury caravan, it is pretty schmick, so we aren’t doing it hard at all. It has been a blast so far, really good. It has its challenges, but the good times far outweigh any stresses. We a really are living the dream.”

Lena said that most people do the camping thing to get away but she said they are more in touch and connected with people than ever before. “People can keep up with our YouTube videos, Instagram and Facebook. With all the social media stickers on our car it says come over and have a chat. It is great and gives people the opportunity to say hi,” she said.

Catch up with the Rok’d Up Adventures crew and their Cape to Cape journey at:

https://www.instagram.com/rokdupadventures/

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCaR3p-2XdCjqxYst7FppC4Q https://www.facebook.com/rokdupadventures/


DYNAMIC DUO READY FOR EPIC SERIES TEST IN THE WEST

Sydney’s MTB quiet achiever Jon Odams likes to keep a low profile and stay under the radar, that is until the cranks start turning and the mud starts to fly. Then the quietly spoken Odams transforms into a vital part of the tight knit, ruthless and all conquering Johnston and Odams GIANT Australia Off Road duo.


Since the introduction of pairs racing in the EPIC Series Oceania in mid 2018, Johnston and Odams have dominated, with wins at Reef to Reef (2018/19) and Port to Port in May. Now they have their sights set on a 2019 series clean sweep, with Western Australia’s iconic four day MTB stage race Cape to Cape (16-20 October) next on their to do list.

MTB bikes have been Jon’s life since he was a teenager, when a couple of mates introduced him to the joy and freedom of the south Sydney’s local trails, where he was inspired by some national MTB legends.
“I lived in an area where there was a little bit of bush and the Royal National Park was not too far away. After a couple of rides around the street we started to ride in the National Park and I got exposed to riding with some really big names of the time, international level guys like Paul Rowney, Rob Woods and Josh Fleming, who all went on to do Olympics and stuff. I played a little bit of soccer before that but nothing really competitively but soon after I got my first MTB, I was racing within three months. I was in under 15s and I just loved it,” he recalled.

“Back then the State Series was pretty strong in both cross country and downhill and I did both. I won State Championships as a junior in both XC and downhill and raced nationals and started winning some national rounds and went to worlds in junior men downhill and got sixth which was pretty good. The downhill side of things was really exciting and downhill was massive. Back then it was a lot more extreme than cross country style of racing but now I think they have made cross country harder. Obviously there are stage races and stuff like that, which are a lot more exciting.”

For a few years Jon’s serious riding took a backseat to some distractions, in the form of cars and girls, but by his late twenties he was back into racing, super competitive and training up a storm.

“I live on the south side of Sydney, near Cronulla so the Royal National Park is the main one I ride in. There are lots of single tracks which are great fun and I have ridden them since I was in high school. I know them pretty well. It is about a ten minute road ride to the trails which is a good warm up and then there is about 100km of fire road and single track out there. The local Strava game is pretty strong as well, which raises the level of all the riders and definitely helps me push every time I go out training, which is good.”

Juggling racing at the elite level with a full time job and family commitments, is a tough ask, but experience has taught Jon to train smarter and more efficiently, and the recent results are proof that it is working.

“I average between 10 and 15 hours a week, which in the scale of things I don’t think is that much. But I am focused on making sure my recovery is really good and that I get the best value for the time I am putting in. Having kids and a family makes the time more valuable, so I am pretty focused and do a lot of research into the training and riding that I do.”

Jon said that the introduction of pairs racing in the EPIC Series has brought with it a different set of challenges and tactics, but it has also given him a brand new focus and lifted the standard of his riding.

“The pairs racing is very different to riding solo, but I am enjoying the category and hanging out with Brendan. It is definitely different as a pair and riding smarter together can change the race dynamics pretty quickly. It is great to be getting the results we have and our racing is going to go from strength to strength. It is wonderful to think that at Cape to Cape we are going for our third series win this year.”

“I have done Cape twice before. I did it four or five years ago when I was on the GIANT team as an Enduro rider and I think I scraped into the top ten. Then I did it again last year and got sixth but I didn’t have the smoothest ride. Over the summer break I have trained a lot harder and gone from being 4, 5, 6th sort of finisher to being able to ride with Brendan and make sure I am not the weakest one in our pairing all the time. Which is a pretty difficult thing to do.”

“Brendan and I have discussed that you can’t ride all three events in the same way, so I am preparing for Cape to Cape differently to how I prepared for Reef to Reef and Port to Port. There is not as much climbing but the racing is faster and the race stays together as a bunch a little bit more. I think that this one might play to our favour a little bit more.”

“All of the Epic Series races are awesome in their own way. The town of Margaret River is a super cool place to ride around in and hang out and it is definitely very different to the east coast where I am from. It will be a nice break but the racing does take the edge of the holiday factor a little,” he laughed. “I know Cape to Cape is Brendan’s favourite of the three Epic Series races in Australia and I really love the last day with all the single track, so I am looking forward to doing better in that time trial shoot out, some stage wins and going three for three. That is the plan.”

The State Government of Western Australia is proud to support the Cape to Cape MTB through Tourism WA's Regional Events Program.

Cape to Cape 2018 – MTB Stage Race, Western Australia 16 – 20 October 2019

Time Trial Wednesday 16 October, 2019

4:30pm Top 20 Elite Open Teams - Leeuwin Estate Winery, Stevens Rd, Margaret River Stage 1 – Cape Leeuwin 17 October, 2019

Start and finish: Cape Leeuwin - Distance: 40km - Climbing: 840m

Race start 9:00am Cape Leeuwin Lighthouse, Leeuwin Rd, Augusta

Stage 2 – Boranup Forest 18 October, 2019

Start and Finish: Leeuwin Estate - Distance: 72km - Climbing: 620m

Race start 8am - Leeuwin Estate Winery, Stevens Rd, Margaret River

Stage 3 - Cowaramup - Middle Earth 19 October, 2019

Start and Finish: Colonial Brewery - Distance: 56km - Climbing: 540m

Race Start 8am - Colonial Brewery, 29 Osmington Rd, Bramley

Stage 4 – Margaret River Special Stage 20 October, 2019

Start and Finish: Margaret River Distillery - Distance: 37km - Climbing: 460m

Race Start 8am Margaret River Distilling Co - Carters Rd and Maxwell Rd, Margaret River

What to expect

  • GOOD MATES - When it comes to Stage Races you’d be mad not to bring a friend or two. Four days in the saddle will give you loads of time to point out what’s lacking in their riding technique and general personality. And it’s always handy to have someone to pull you up the hills on day four.
  • FUN TRAILS - We’ve scouted the funnest trails we could find, with loads of variety each day and achievable distances (30km min, 60km max). The perfect balance of enjoyable time on the bike and enjoyable time sipping beer.
  • COLD BEERS - Speaking of beer. We’re all for it. Very few things work up a thirst like a multi-stage MTB race. Which is why you’ll find we position our bar so close to the daily finish line.

EPIC NEW ZEALAND MOUNTAIN BIKE EVENT ON THE MOVE

The Pioneer Mountain Bike Stage Race is on the move, with organisers confirming the event will further evolve with a shift to the North Island in November 2020.

In its fourth year, the 2019 Pioneer, fuelled by Nutri-Grain, will be held from Sunday 1st December this year. The event starts and finishes in Queenstown, taking in a prologue and six stages totalling 433 km of riding and 12,540 metres of climbing, with Lake Moke, Alexandra and Bannockburn hosting overnight villages before the event finishes at the Queenstown Events Centre with a celebration dinner on the Friday evening.

IRONMAN Oceania Managing Director and race founder Dave Beeche says the internationally renowned event has enjoyed every moment in the stunning Central Otago region, but says it is time for the event to continue to live up to one of its pillar statements of ‘Ride Beyond’ and head to new trails for 2020.

“We have always seen the Pioneer as an event that celebrates New Zealand, one that brings international and local riders alike back year after year to enjoy world class riding trails, an epic challenge and get a taste of our legendary hospitality.

“To that end it is time to further evolve an event that is never standing still and always looking for new and innovative ways to engage with our riders and that international community. The Pioneer has already created lifelong memories and taken riders on some amazing trails, from Christchurch, Lake Tekapo, Ben Ohau, Lake Hawea, Snow Farm, Bannockburn and many more. And now in 2020 we will add to that impressive array of New Zealand’s best riding trails and stunning countryside at the yet to be disclosed new North Island location.

“The Queenstown and Central Otago communities have been wonderful hosts these past few years, as was Christchurch for our inaugural Pioneer back in 2016. I have no doubt the event will return to the region again in the future and take riders on another amazing week of riding.

“But our next step will add another chapter to the already storied history of this wonderful event and showcase a new and equally exciting area of the country to our local and international riders. Just as the Cape Epic – the pinnacle event of the Epic Series, is constantly changing and introducing new stages and locations, so too will The Pioneer. Our advantage in that sense is that we have an entire country to choose from, with a host of stunning scenery and a fast growing and amazing array of stage options on the New Zealand cycle trail network.”

More specific details of the new location will likely be revealed first to the 2019 riders, with an announcement expected at the event’s final dinner and presentations in Queenstown on December 6.

Beeche says the decision to confirm the move now has been made with current and future riders in mind.

“The Pioneer is an event that requires considerable planning by those riding and while we are not yet in a position to confirm the exact details of the new location for 2020, we felt it imperative to let the mountain bike community know of the move now to assist in their planning. That might be short term with a decision to enter the 2019 event in Queenstown, or longer term allowing them to plan for the new location in 2020.”

Beeche was at pains to stress that this is goodbye for now, but not forever to Central Otago.

“This is not the end of the trail for Queenstown and Central Otago, I have no doubt that the region might loom large in our future planning, but for the short term we are committed to an exciting and equally challenging new location, one that will live up to our unique Pioneer experience of Find Stunning, Find Welcome and Find Character over six days of epic riding.”

Riders wanting to enter the 2019 event and enjoy the stunning trails of the Central Otago can still do so. With ten weeks preparation time riders would not want to be starting from scratch but can certainly add the finishing touches to their base fitness and join riders from New Zealand and around the world in a stunning six-day journey taking in a mix of single track.

Already the event has attracted riders from 24 countries and will once again showcase New Zealand and the region to the world. In total 41 countries have been represented across the four years of The Pioneer.

In light of today’s news, organisers have extended the scheduled price increase for potential 2019 riders out to October 6, further details can be found at www.thepioneer.co.nz

2019 The Pioneer, Fuelled by Nutri-Grain, Overview

  • 433km of riding
  • 12,540m of climbing
  • MTB Single Track 22%
  • Cycle Trail 14%
  • 4WD Farm Track 37%
  • Sealed Rd 14%
  • Gravel Rd 13%

Land Rover Present a Rugged and Untamed Absa Cape Epic Route

The 2020 Absa Cape Epic will be The Race That Measures All thanks to a rugged and untamed route. Taking in 647 kilometres and 15 550 metres of climbing it will challenge and reward on the trails from Cape Town to Val de Vie.

The 2020 Absa Cape Epic

From the 15th to the 22nd of March 2020, the Absa Cape Epic will provide 1 300 mountain bikers with their toughest mountain bike challenge of the year. Rugged mountain passes and rocky singletrack ascents, though pristine fynbos await. As do sandy farm roads, between manicured orchards, and bone-rattling descents off ancient mountain ranges. This is the race that measures all on an untamed route, proudly brought to you by Land Rover, the Official Vehicle and Route Partner.

Longer than 2019, but with less metres of vertical ascent, the 2020 route uses the rocky African hinterland to provide the major challenges. It is a course for the nimble mountain goats, rather than the pure power machines. Expect punctures and mechanicals to have their say in the final general classification standings, as any moment of fatigue or undue risk could be punished severely. At 647 kilometres in length, with 15 550 metres of climbing, the bare numbers hide the true story.

Starting on the slopes of Table Mountain National Park, the 2020 Absa Cape Epic provides a familiar introduction to the event during the Prologue. Then it is transfer time, driving north to Ceres, ahead of Stage 1. Returning for the first time in a decade to the Western Cape’s deciduous fruit farming heartland and the famed Eselfontein trails. The opening marathon day sets the tone for the race, distance is rebuffed in favour of rugged technicality – it will be eight days in Land Rover heaven. Rocks, ruts, sand and off-camber corners fill the trails to Val de Vie.

The Queen Stage is early in the race, but Stage 2 is far from being head-and-shoulders more technical than the rest of the route. It explores the infamously tough Witzenberg Valley, a region where only the hard men and women of mountain biking thrive. Stage 3 continues the challenge, with a day back-loaded with climbing; including the race’s toughest ascent inside the final 20 kilometres of the day. The second moving stage, from Tulbagh to Wellington takes riders into a forgotten valley, into the Zuurvlakte.

Once in Wellington the trails become steeper and slightly smoother. The Wild Boar routes, which wind their way through the forested and fynbos covered slopes of the Groenberg and Hawequa mountains, provide much of the trills and many of the challenges too. Stage 5 is the steepest of the race, featuring 35 metres of elevation gain per kilometre, while Stage 6 is the penultimate and second longest of the race.

The Grand Finale takes riders from Wellington to Val de Vie for a fittingly glamourous finish to the World’s Premier Mountain Bike Stage Race. Reaching the last finish line is not easy. The Trail to Val de Vie’s 66 hard kilometres provide an appropriately rugged end to the 2020 Absa Cape Epic and ensure that every finisher earns his or her place in the Book of Legend.

Prologue

Sunday, 15 March

Distance: 20km

Climbing: 600m

Start Location: University of Cape Town

Finish Location: University of Cape Town

Table of the Cape

Cape Town’s iconic flat mountain provides fast and technical, at times, riding for the opening kilometres of the 2020 Absa Cape Epic, in Table Mountain National Park. Returning riders will be well briefed on what to expect; steep gradients heading both up and downhill, massive trail-side crowds and a flutter of pre-race butterflies. The race’s inaugural Land Rover Technical Terrain is provided by the now infamous Plum Pudding.

 

Stage 1

Monday, 16 March

Distance: 98km

Climbing: 1 800m

Start Location: Ceres

Finish Location: Ceres

Rating: 4 stars

Saddle Up

Not since 2013, has Stage 1 of the Absa Cape Epic dipped below the 100-kilometre mark. It is definitely no play-day though. Hard work lies ahead, to harvest the rewards of the exceptional Eselfontein trails, home to some of the oldest purpose-built mountain biking trails in the country. The Pipeline descent is one of the newer additions to the farm’s trail network and serves as the day’s Land Rover Technical Terrain.

 

Stage 2

Tuesday, 17 March

Distance: 94km

Climbing: 2 050m

Start Location: Ceres

Finish Location: Saronsberg, Tulbagh

Rating: 5 stars

Forgive My Sins

The Witzenberg Valley is undoubtedly one of mountain biking’s most challenging playgrounds, making Stage 2 a fitting holder for the title of Queen Stage. Sheets of sandstone provide the ultimate testing ground for man, woman and of course machine. No quarter is given by Mother Nature in this fertile valley. For those strong enough not to require one, there are rewards around every kink in the trail. The Skurfberg singletrack climb, through sandstone massifs, provides a challenging entrance to the Witzenberg Valley and the stage’s Land Rover Technical Terrain.

 

Stage 3

Wednesday, 18 March

Distance: 88km

Climbing: 2 100m

Start Location: Saronsberg, Tulbagh

Finish Location: Saronsberg, Tulbagh

Rating: 4.5 stars

The Winter Summit

With two converging mountain ranges to explore, Stage 3 of the 2020 Absa Cape Epic is not short on climbing. Nestled in the nook between the Groot Winterhoek and the Witzenberg Ranges, the Tulbagh Valley is not hasty to reveal its rewards. The stage features the first Dimension Data Hotspot sprint, down the town’s 300 year old Church Street and arguably the toughest climb in the race. Assegaaibos, a section of virgin trail, provides the Land Rover Technical Terrain.

 

Stage 4

Thursday, 19 March

Distance: 101km

Climbing: 1 950m

Start Location: Saronsberg, Tulbagh

Finish Location: CPUT, Wellington

Rating: 4 stars

The Forgotten Valley

After three days with precious few free kilometres the transition stage from Saronsberg, in Tulbagh, to the Cape Peninsula University of Technology’s Wellington campus appears on paper to be an easier day. The first 100-kilometre plus stage includes more asphalt than any other in the race. It is however, anything but easy exploring one of the most truly untamed valleys in the Western Cape. A low range 4x4 worthy stretch of dual track, the Bull Run, is the designated Land Rover Technical Terrain.

 

Stage 5

Friday, 20 March

Distance: 85km

Climbing: 2 900m

Start Location: CPUT, Wellington

Finish Location: CPUT, Wellington

Rating: 4.5 stars

The Only Way Is Up

Short and brutally steep, on exhausted legs, Stage 5 will be a major physical and psychological hurdle on the trail to Val de Vie. In the past, stages like these have been dubbed play days, but there is little playful about this intense test. Challenging climbs are followed by white-knuckle singletrack descents. The Land Rover Technical Terrain – the Full Monty – cannot be ridden stripped of skill and wits so conserve your energy for the stage’s last dance.

 

Stage 6

Saturday, 21 March

Distance: 95km

Climbing: 2 300m

Start Location: CPUT, Wellington

Finish Location: CPUT, Wellington

Rating: 4 stars

Into The Wild

A saw tooth profile is exactly what riders do not want to see, come the penultimate day of the Absa Cape Epic. Riding through a private nature reserve, the presence of a zebra, eland, springbok and giraffe will serve as welcome distraction from aching legs. Rocky Horror mid-way through the stage, features the most fearsome name of any Land Rover Technical Terrain in the race and proves the theory of nominative determinism.

 

Stage 7

Sunday, 22 March

Distance: 66km

Climbing: 1 850m

Start Location: CPUT, Wellington

Finish Location: Val de Vie

Rating: 3.5 stars

The Trail to Val de Vie

Between Wellington and Val de Vie lie a final 66 kilometres of Untamed mountain biking. A last test to ensure that no finisher’s medal is handed over, without the realisation being driven home, that it was hard-earned. Bone Rattler marks the 2020 Grand Finale’s Land Rover Technical Terrain, after which it is a relatively smooth ride through Val de Vie’s immaculate grounds and lawns and into the Book of Legend.


2019 Swiss Epic delivers tight racing and unforgettable moments; sights now set on 2020 brand-new route

The 2019 Swiss Epic delivered exciting racing in the UCI Men’s and Women’s fields while a total of 574 registered amateur riders attempted the five-day mountain biking stage race in the Graubunden region of Switzerland.  Now sights are set for 2020 event featuring highlight-packed route of Laax – Arosa – Davos with general registration opening on 9 September 2019.

Adelheid Morath and Bettina Janas during Stage 5 of the 2019 Swiss Epic from Lenzerheide to Davos, Graubünden, Switzerland on 24 August 2019. Photo by Sam Clark.

It was a memorable and action-packed week in the Swiss Alps as the 2019 Swiss Epic unfolded in a fierce battle of willpower for the UCI Men’s and Women’s fields with mechanicals, illnesses, crashes, and exhaustion affecting performances and strategies.  Meanwhile, a total of 574 amateur riders making up 287 teams from 41 countries started their journey to the finish line, sharing the same exquisite but challenging trails with the professional riders.

Kicking off in a wet and cold Davos on Tuesday 20 August, riders were in for a muddy first stage from Davos to St. Moritz negotiating 3,000 meters of cumulative climbing over the 86km opening stage.  It was team Trek Selle San Marco and team Shimano S-Phyre that claimed the stage victories in the UCI Men and UCI Women’s categories respectively.

Heading into Stage 2, all eyes were on the race leaders with expectations high that they would retain their lead and pull another stage victory out the bag.  A 65km circular course around St. Moritz, Stage 2 was comparatively short but steep featuring panoramic views as the weather slowly started clearing to reveal the true beauty of the surroundings.  In sharp end of the racing field, the Trek Selle San Marco team of Michele Casagrande and Fabian Rabensteiner kept their lead firm, while the UCI Women’s category saw new stage winners in the form of KS Trek’s Adelheid Morath and Bettina Janas.

Stage 3 brought another transition as the race made its way from St. Moritz to Lenzerheide for the 80km Queen’s Stage. The technical trails and varying terrain including a section of the Lenzerheide Word Championships XCO course favoured the cross-country riders with team jb BRUNEX / Fischer BMC claiming the men’s stage win, while KS Trek held firm in the women’s field.  The penultimate stage of 48km around Lenzerheide during Stage 4 saw the return of the Trek Selle San Marco team across the line first while team KS Trek extended their lead in the women’s race with their third consecutive stage victory.

The Grand Finale between Lenzerheide and Davos concluded the week’s racing in spectacular fashion as team Trek Selle San Marco A wrapped up the overall title while Devonbosch Stellenbosch took the stage honours in the UCI Men’s division.  In the UCI Women’s division it was a dominant performance in the end by KS Trek with four stage wins and the overall title to add to their names.

A total of 253 amateur teams completed the 2019 Swiss Epic, along with a total of 28 individual riders whose partners were unable to complete the event.  A remarkable feat of riding as well as organisation, the 2019 Swiss Epic saw riders complete over 11,900 meters of cumulative climbing as 200 crew and 800 local volunteers from 14 local communities ensured a smooth race experience throughout.

The focus now shifts to 2020 as the Swiss Epic continues the tradition of changing its route year after year, bringing riders a brand-new experience in the scenic Graübunden region next year.  Enjoying the same warm and welcoming hospitality of the region, riders can look forward to a five-day stage race, from 18 to 22 August 2020. The journey will start in Laax where riders will spend two days traversing the trails before heading to the well-known Arosa village.  An Alpine resort village in the Schanfigg Valley, Arosa is known for its beautiful lakes, mountain slopes and trails.  After two days in Arosa, riders will transition to Davos, host of the sold out 2019 Swiss Epic start and finish, for pure mountain biking fun with breathtaking climbs and panoramic views.

The 2020 Swiss Epic will once again offer riders a full-service mountain biking experience with five nights in luxury Swiss hotels, breakfast and dinner in the race village accommodation, bike wash and servicing after each stage and door-to-door transport of the official Swiss Epic rider bags between their hotels. In addition, riders stand the exclusive chance to win one of 15 sought-after qualifying slots to the Absa Cape Epic stage race in South Africa.

General registration for the 2020 Swiss Epic opens on Monday, 9 September 2019 at 4pm CET.  To sign up to be notified when registration opens, visit the website here.


Back with a bang and riding for a cause

Stage 3 of the 2019 Swiss Epic saw riders tackle the Queen Stage of this year’s event, covering 80km between St. Moritz and Lenzerheide.  With 2,200m of ascent and 2,450m of descent, riders were yet again in for a tough day in the saddle.

Winding up the spectacular Albula Pass, the highest point of the Stage came early on as riders climbed to the top of the pass before being rewarded with the flowing trail to Bergun.  With the weather having cleared, the majority of the day was ridden in sunshine allowing teams to take in the magnificent views on their near endless descent to Filisur.  It was onwards to negotiate the sparse forest terrain to reach the plateau between Lenz and Lenzerheide which offered riders passage into the ultimate bit of mountain biking fun – the World Championship XC 2018 track.

Out conquering the passes and trails alongside hundreds of riders from countries as far afield as Brazil, Ecuador and Spain were South African duo, Team Intrepid.  The team made up of Denzyl O’Donoghue and Pieter du Preez are taking on their second Swiss Epic event, after last year’s race did not quite go to plan.

“It was very unfortunate. I misjudged things or overestimated my ability and I broke my foot.  The Swiss Epic staff and the support staff were really helpful. They got me off the mountain and to the hospital. I spent 12 weeks on crutches; Pieter and I were pretty resilient about the experience – we sat down and said, ‘We’re going to do this again’,” explained Denzyl.

Except the pair decided to go a little further than simply going back to conquer the Swiss mountains.  “We invented a campaign where we collect money for children and people who suffer from cancer.  We got sponsors for the Absa Cape Epic which we finished this year, and now we’re doing all three Epic Series Legend races [the Absa Cape Epic, the Swiss Epic and the Pioneer] in the same year with the idea of collecting money for charities that support cancer patients,” Denzyl said. “Up until now we’ve collected R275,000 and we hope that we’ll raise half a million Rand by the time we complete the Swiss Epic and Pioneer,” he added.

The team have been enjoying the course thus far while raising funds for a great cause. “It’s just a fantastic course, and you know these days I think everyone knows someone very close to them that has cancer and CANSA Active is just a fantastic charity to support; we want to thank everyone that supported our cause,” Pieter said.  “We’re from Cape Town and the climbing has been challenging, but it’s been great out there and really enjoyable.” he added.

By finishing the race this week, Denzyl and Pieter will be well on their way to becoming Epic Legends – a special group of riders who have completed all three Epic Legends races by finishing the Absa Cape Epic in South Africa, the Swiss Epic in Switzerland and the Pioneer, fueled by Nutri-Grain in New Zealand.

“I don’t know if anybody else has done all three in the same year!” Denzyl laughed. “We did three Absa Cape Epic races consecutively and we’re doing these three Epic Series races as a team consecutively so it will be five Epic races in three years,” he said with a smile.

Looking forward to the next few days of riding, Denzyl and Pieter aren’t shying away from the challenge of the climbs and the distance to cover.  “Personally, I think the Swiss Epic must be challenging otherwise it’s not the Swiss Epic. So, I have to be in pain at some point during the day but when I’m staying here [in Switzerland] and now look at you, I must feel good. That’s what I’m hoping for during the next few days. I don’t want to end up with a heart attack, but I must feel tired and feel that I earned the ride,” a motivated Denzyl explained.

Pieter’s outlook on the journey of completing the Swiss Epic is one we can all take to heart. “It’s a fantastic challenge, we’re just looking forward to the end of each day and to be here in one piece. We take it day by day and kilometre by kilometre. Hopefully we’ll get to the end in Davos eventually on Saturday and have a good party!”.

For more of the 2019 Swiss Epic action, tune into www.swiss-epic.com from 08:30.


The Quest for Epic Legend Status in the Swiss Alps - Part 2

Mike Blewitt, Craig Wylie and Gavin Wille are all in search of the final finisher’s medal in their Epic Series respective palmarès at the Swiss Epic. If they complete the Swiss Epic they will join the prestigious Epic Legends club.

Stage 2 of the Epic Series race, The Swiss Epic, took riders to the highest point of the race; the Laj Alv natural reservoir, at 2 543 metres above sea level. The route is back-loaded with climbing, with the day’s two most significant climbs falling within the final 25 kilometres of the 69-kilometre-long stage.

The potential Epic Legends featured today all live in Australia or New Zealand who have made the journey to the other side of the world in picturesque Switzerland.

Mike Blewitt, or Mr. Marathon MTB (as he is affectionately known), is no stranger to stage races and has made a career of the mountain biking industry from a racing and media perspective. Mike first encountered the Epic Series when he ventured to South Africa’s Western Cape in 2011 to tackle the Untamed African MTB Race – the Absa Cape Epic.

https://youtu.be/MJ_qZ_onuCU

A tough first bite at the Epic Series was enough to have him hooked and in 2017 he completed his first Pioneer, fuelled by Nutri-Grain in the backcountry of New Zealand, followed by a consecutive finish in 2018. The Swiss Epic hasn’t been smooth sailing for Mike though; his first attempt was back in 2015 where he was set to add another notch to his metaphorical Epic Series belt, but he was forced to withdraw due to illness. This year he is back and is set on claiming his Epic Legend status and accompanying medal, “I don’t want to count chickens before they hatch but getting the Epic Legend medal is a big motivator for me” he said.

After Stage 2, Mike and his partner, Imogen Smith, are currently leading the mixed category; Mike has completed done all other Epic Series races bar the Port to Port (which is next on their combined bucket list). Imogen is no stranger to stage races either and has her eyes set on her Epic Legend medal at the 2020 Absa Cape Epic.

Craig Wylie and Gavin Wille were given the title of Unlikely Legends, a title they are looking to ditch at this year’s Swiss Epic.

Craig and Gavin have quite a story that dates back long before they even set foot on the start line in Graubünden (read the history of these chaps here) and are both looking to claim their Epic Legends medals upon their safe return to Davos in roughly 250km and 8000m of climbing’s time. Yesterday they completed the opening stage in 06:39:57 and bettered their time today when they completed Stage 2 in 6:14:55 with smiles spread widely across their faces and plenty of energy in the reserves (the proof is in the victorious bunny hop). Craig said, “Back in 2017 we got everything wrong in the Absa Cape Epic, from a nutrition and game plan point of view. It’s just gotten better and better from last year’s Pioneer, fuelled by Nutri-Grain and now it is great!”. In comparing the Epic Series races, he admitted “They’re all tough. The Cape Epic is sandy and rocky, the Pioneer has tons of climbing, and the Swiss Epic has even more climbing per kilometre. But I cried more in the Cape Epic.”

Neither of the two have visited the Graubünden region before and Gavin had to admit that “Looking down to St. Moritz today was the best part. You simply cannot beat this view.” The pair then went on to compare the best and worst of each race: “The Swiss Epic wins hands down with the hotel comfort and sleep ins. And no bag pipes waking you up at 05:30 like at the Cape Epic!”